Political economy of journalism

The first theme of revenue sources examined literature that called for the use of tax breaks to aid the profits of daily newspapers as well as posited that a new market for online digital content can be found within the same market targeted by online streaming websites like Netflix, Hulu, and Pandora.

The course follows these presuppositions by thematically moving from general topics to more specific issues. Because of newer recording technologies, especially the growing spread of cell phones throughout the world, almost anyone can become a citizen journalist simply by recording news worthy events.

Finally, the changing role of authority in the U. A lot of focus is placed on the shift of companies from traditional to digital, but what about a company like Mashable, which is inherently digital and is now trying to provide more traditional, investigative news stories?

While each theme has played a distinct role in the ongoing journalism crisis, it is clear from this framework that the changing financial landscape of news consumption has become the common thread that ties the three together.

Evolution of political economy

Ultimately, the best way to reaffirm the authority of traditional media sources may be to have citizen and professional journalists work together to provide for the news needs of marginalized voices while also providing the contextualization and technical skills necessary to understand the true extent of a news piece. The declining revenue involved in print newspapers has opened up analysis into the content of the journalism itself, and the several ways that profit losses have altered, and even worsened, news stories. Political economy is considered one of the most important critical research traditions in media and communication studies and a central approach for a structural and systemic analysis of media and cultural industries as parts of global capitalism. Content Syllabus outline The course provides a theoretical and practical introduction to the political economy approach to journalism and media more generally. While this literature review is not exhaustive, it has become apparent that several important questions in the field of the political economy of journalism have gone unanswered. The availability of information can now be skewed or influenced through "search, aggregation, and digital distribution infrastructures" p. A status quo within the news industry exists, as evidenced by the reticence, and ultimate difficulty, in adapting to digital technologies. By this, they will understand what limitations media organizations face because of their economic organization, while also being aware of the current technological changes and transformations in globalized capitalism. The course follows these presuppositions by thematically moving from general topics to more specific issues. This review of the political economy of journalism has focused on three main themes centered around the crisis that journalism is currently facing- traditional news sources such as daily, print newspapers have not been able to adapt to a burgeoning demand for digitalized news content forcing cuts to the size of newsrooms that have directly affected the quality of investigative journalism. The first theme of revenue sources examined literature that called for the use of tax breaks to aid the profits of daily newspapers as well as posited that a new market for online digital content can be found within the same market targeted by online streaming websites like Netflix, Hulu, and Pandora. The theme of falling revenues—and the means to rectify the lack of profit within the newspaper industry—is apparent throughout the academic literature of journalism in the 21st century, as daily newspapers are viewed as the main source of critical analysis provided to a mass audience, especially through the provision of investigative journalism.

Intended learning outcomes: Students will be acquainted with one of the central critical approaches in media and communication studies, which gained in relevance because of structural shifts in media industries, technological changes and political-economic transformations happening on the global level.

While it is important, as Riaz and Pasha established, for citizen journalists to be able to speak to a more localized, and often centralized audience, which mass media publications have difficulty doing because of a wide degree of needs across the country.

Even if this can be accomplished, all newspapers must brace themselves for the inevitable re-location to a purely online model. After briefly discussing the inability of newspapers to adapt to 21st century profit-making strategies, Schmalbeck focuses on seven ways that newspapers could fortify their financing structures, including tolerating operating losses as a form of altruism within the existing corporate structure, redefining daily newspaper operators as nonprofit corporations exempt from federal income tax, or having pre-existing charities run the daily newspapers either directly or through a taxable subsidiary corporation.

The theme of falling revenues—and the means to rectify the lack of profit within the newspaper industry—is apparent throughout the academic literature of journalism in the 21st century, as daily newspapers are viewed as the main source of critical analysis provided to a mass audience, especially through the provision of investigative journalism.

Attempts to make journalism a public good would hit back against an industry with immensely lucrative historical roots. However, new mechanisms of power have emerged from this more open system of information and news creation.

Political economy of journalism

Riaz and Pasha further explain how citizen journalists are given authority by their readership because they can appeal to more niche audiences. Such mechanisms influence what types of content are published or not published, the nature of the commodity content vs. Satirical news shows like The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and Last Week Tonight were also examined, as a large percentage of young adults view them as a primary source of news, and questions have been raised as to whether or not these shows are producing journalistic content. Pictures and videos are a vital part of news story telling, but it is important as well to understand why a certain event is being covered; the ramifications of a story being printed. A lot of focus is placed on the shift of companies from traditional to digital, but what about a company like Mashable, which is inherently digital and is now trying to provide more traditional, investigative news stories? And while it is possible that newspapers could reach such dire financial straits that they back a shift to a non-profit, voucher system as suggested by McChesney, convincing Congress that a previously privatized industry should now be granted taxpayer dollars will be incredibly difficult, as support will be, at best, split along part lines as Republicans will most likely advocate instead for freer market solutions. Attempts to make journalism a public good would hit back against an industry with immensely lucrative historical roots. Additionally, scholars need to question just how malleable the capitalist overtones of the U. This is due in part to the overwhelming amount of public relations material being posed as news. The two simply understand the need for newspapers to change to fit the digital paradigm. Overall, it appears that the most important factor in ensuring a strong, continued news industry in the U.

Just as in the citizen versus professional journalism debate, contextualization is a key responsibility of professional journalists.

In the fourth part, some of the key shifts in journalism are identified and analysed in relation to the political and economic changes, with a particular focus on the crisis of the existing economic model of the media industries, which materially supported journalism throughout the twentieth century.

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Political economy of communications